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evh1 | Since 2005 임희재 | 블루티쳐학원 | 01033383436 | 200710 22:34:52

 

GRAMMAR

정답에 O표시, 이유를 쓰세요.



EVH1 1-1


1. From time to time, you are told [what / that] by parents or teachers to "think outside the box."



2. Looking at a problem from a different perspective can lead you [for / to] a new approach to handle the problem.



3. Looking at a problem from a different perspective can lead you to a new approach [to / for] handle the problem.



4. The [following / followed] stories show how changing your perspective can change your life.



5. The following stories show how [changing / changed] your perspective can change your life.



6. [Look / Looking] at a problem from a different perspective can lead you to a new approach to handle the problem.



7. from time [for / to] time, you are told by parents or teachers to "think outside the box."


 

EVH1 1-2


8. A professor walked [on around / around on] a stage while teaching.



9. A professor walked around on a stage while [teaching / taught].



10. If I [hold / will hold] it for an entire day, my arm will likely cramp up, which will force me to eventually drop the glass.



11. If I hold it for a minute or two, [it / which]'s fairly light.



12. If I hold it for an entire day, my arm will likely [cramp / to cramp] up, which will force me to eventually drop the glass.



13. If I hold it for an entire day, my arm will likely cramp up, [it / which] will force me to eventually drop the glass.



14. If I hold it for an entire day, my arm will likely cramp up, which will force me to [eventual / eventually] drop the glass.



15. If I hold it for an hour, [it / which] may make my arm ache.



16. If I hold it for an hour, it may make my [arm / to arm] ache.



17. In each case, the weight of the glass doesn't change, but the longer I hold it, [heavier the / the heavier] it feels to me."



18. She raised a glass of water and [asking / asked], "How heavy is this glass of water?"


 

EVH1 1-3


19. "Yes, but [look / looks] closer," he said, "and tell me what happened to each."



20. Finally, she took a sip of the coffee and [smiling / smiled] at the aroma.



21. He filled three pots [with / for] water and placed potatoes, eggs, and ground coffee beans in each of the three pots.



22. He filled three pots with water and [placing / placed] potatoes, eggs, and ground coffee beans in each of the three pots.



23. He filled three pots with water and placed potatoes, eggs, and ground coffee beans in each of the three [pot / pots].



24. One day, a daughter complained to her father about the problems she was [struggling / struggling with].



25. One day, a daughter complained to her father about the problems she was struggling [with / with it].



26. She was [frustrating / frustrated] because it seemed that just as one problem was solved, another followed.



27. [Turn / Turning] to her, he asked, "What do you see?"


 

EVH1 1-4


28. "The potato was strong and hard, but became soft and weak after sitting in the [boiling / boiled] water.



29. He explained that each of these [object / objects] had faced the same adversity, but each one reacted differently.



30. He explained that each of these objects [have faced / had faced] the same adversity, but each one reacted differently.



31. Or, you can change the circumstance that was [brought / brought about] by adversity for the better.



32. Or, you can change the circumstance that was brought [by about / about by] adversity for the better.



33. The ground coffee beans stayed intact but [changing / changed] the water itself, making it fragrant and flavorful."



34. The ground coffee beans stayed intact but changed the water [it / itself], making it fragrant and flavorful."



35. The ground coffee beans stayed intact but changed the water itself, [made / making] it fragrant and flavorful."



36. The inside of the egg was fragile but became [hardening / hardened]after being boiled in the water.



37. The inside of the egg was fragile but became hardened after [boiled / being boiled] in the water.


 

EVH1 1-5


38. A wise old man, upon hearing of the boy, [had / having] traveled far to watch his races.



39. A wise old man, upon hearing of the boy, [have traveled / had traveled]far to watch his races.



40. After [hearing / heard] this, the wise man said to him, "Now I present two new challengers to you."



41. He ran to the wise man and [asking / asked], "Why don't people cheer for me now?"



42. In the middle of the crowd was sitting the wise old man, [looked / looking] calmly at the boy.



43. Once upon a time, there lived a young athletic boy who prepared [him / himself] for a running competition.



44. The little boy felt [proud / proudly] and important.



45. The little boy noted that the crowd did not cheer for him this time, [it / which] puzzled him.



46. The race began, and the boy was the only finisher because the elderly lady and the blind man were left standing at the [starting / started] line.



47. Though the crowd cheered loudly for the boy, the wise man stayed still and calm, [expressed / expressing] no sentiment.



48. [Behind him an / Behind him were an] elderly lady and a blind man.



49. [When / Whenever] the boy was running for a prize, a large crowd gathered together to watch the race.


 

EVH1 1-6


50. "Race again," replied the wise man, "but this time, [finish / finishing]together."



51. He said, "Well [done / doing], little boy.



52. Now the little boy was greatly delighted, and he felt [proud / proudly]and important again.



53. The little boy stood between the blind man and the elderly lady, [holded / holding] them arm in arm.



54. When they crossed the [finishing / finished] line, the crowd cheered loudly and waved at the boy.



55. When they crossed the finishing line, the crowd cheered loudly and [waving / waved] at the boy.



56. You've won a lot more in this race than [in / X] any other you've run before.



57. You've won a lot more in this race than in any other you've run [before / before it].


 

EVH1 2-1


58. It is rooted in our cultural identities and provides a foundation of wisdom and knowledge [upon them / upon which] to build sustainable development for all.



59. It is rooted in our cultural identities and provides a foundation of wisdom and knowledge upon which [build / to build] sustainable development for all.



60. It is the way we understand the world and the means [by them / by which] we shape it.



61. Only they can protect it and [pass / passs] it on to tomorrow's generations.



62. Our intangible cultural heritage is a bridge [linking / linked] our past and our future.



63. The [following / followed] pages offer an insight into the great diversity of humanity's living heritage across the world.



64. it is rooted in our cultural identities and provides a foundation [for / of]wisdom and knowledge upon which to build sustainable development for all.


 

EVH1 2-2


65. A castell is a tower of people standing on each other's shoulders, often raised as [high / highly] as ten levels.



66. Anybody [who / which] is willing to help, from children to senior citizens, can be part of the pinya by supporting the tower and protecting it from collapsing.



67. Anybody who is [will / willing] to help, from children to senior citizens, can be part of the pinya by supporting the tower and protecting it from collapsing.



68. Anybody who is willing to help, from children [for / to] senior citizens, can be part of the pinya by supporting the tower and protecting it from collapsing.



69. Anybody who is willing to help, from children to senior citizens, [to / can]be part of the pinya by supporting the tower and protecting it from collapsing.



70. When the last person reaches [to / X] the top and waves his or her hands, the crowd below shouts and cheers.


 

EVH1 2-3


71. A castell requires between 75 and 500 people to build, all [of them / of whom] wear a group color.



72. Building one provides people with a strong sense of belonging and a [heightening / heightened] spirit of teamwork and cooperation.



73. The color is a proud element of a community, and young children long for the day when they can wear a shirt and [play / plays] their role in building their group's castell.



74. The knowledge about how to build castells is accumulated over generations and [handing / handed] down from generation to generation within a community, and can only be learned by practice.



75. The knowledge about how to build castells is accumulated over generations and handed down from generation [for / to] generation within a community, and can only be learned by practice.


 

EVH1 2-4


76. Bake the [shaping / shaped] dough until it turns light yellow in color.



77. Coloring is the next step, after which a second [drying / dried] takes place.



78. Dip the [stringing / strung] licitars into the glaze and hang them until they dry.



79. Dip the strung licitars into the glaze and [hang / hangs] them until they dry.



80. Gingerbread broadly [refers / refers to] any type of baked treat that is typically flavored with ginger and honey.



81. Gingerbread broadly refers to any type of [baking / baked] treat that is typically flavored with ginger and honey.



82. Once [drying / dried], the licitars are decorated.



83. Prepare dough and [let / lets] it mature for a few days.



84. The dough matures for a few days, then is shaped in molds and [baking / baked], and then left for two weeks to dry.



85. The process of making a licitar, a type of Croatian gingerbread, [is / are]special because it requires skill and endurance.


 

EVH1 2-5


86. A licitar is uniquely Croatian [because of / because for] the long history and the social role it has played.



87. Gingerbread craftspeople [appear / appear at] most festivals and fairs in Croatia.



88. People watch cookies [to be / being] made and socialize.



89. Since then, making licitars has become a family tradition where secrets are passed down from generation [for / to] generation.


 

EVH1 2-6


90. In Korean juldarigi, making a rice straw rope as well as [moving / moved]it to a ritual site is part of the tradition.



91. In the Philippines, punnuk is held in the Hapao River, [there / where]people tug young trees that are tightly bundled with vines and hooked to a straw figure in the middle.



92. In the Philippines, punnuk is held in the Hapao River, where people tug young trees that are tightly bundled with vines and [hooking / hooked] to a straw figure in the middle.



93. The rope stands for a dragon which is [believing / believed] to bring rain to the region.



94. The rope stands for a dragon which is believed to bring rain [to / for] the region.



95. The way the ritual is performed [varies / varies from] place to place.



96. The way the ritual is performed varies from place [for / to] place.



97. Tugging has long been [practicing / practiced] as a kind of ritual in many agricultural regions across Asia.



98. Tugging has long been [practicing / practiced] as a kind of ritual in many agricultural regions across Asia.


 

EVH1 2-7


99. The tugging rituals in Asia are mostly held by rice farmers, [whose / who]wish for enough rainfall and abundant harvests, so the rituals can be regarded as a form of prayer in the region.



100. There is no intentional [competitive / competitiveness] element inherent in the rituals, and winning or losing is not emphasized.



101. There is no intentional competitive element inherent in the rituals, and [win / winning] or losing is not emphasized.



102. While [preparing / prepared] for the rituals and performing them, participants realize the importance of solidarity, cooperation, and harmony among community members.


 

EVH1 3-1


103. Human beings are capable [for / of] doing amazing things through sports.



104. Human beings are capable of doing [amazing / amazed] things through sports.



105. Whatever we do on earth, however, [is / are] governed by the rules of nature.



106. [However / Whatever] we do on earth, however, is governed by the rules of nature.


 

EVH1 3-2


107. Animals like the adult cheetah can run 100 meters [about in / in about]six seconds.



108. This is [why / because] they can run fast.



109. Usain Bolt, the Jamaican sprinter, broke the world record for the 100-meter sprint in 2009, [clocked / clocking] a time of 9.58 seconds.


 

EVH1 3-3


110. Many experts predict, however, [what / that] a human being could probably run the 100-meter sprint in just over nine seconds.



111. The problem for humans is that the harder they hit the ground, [more the / the more] time they spend in the air, which makes their steps longer but reduces the number of steps they can take.



112. The problem for humans is that the harder they hit the ground, the more time they spend in the air, [it / which] makes their steps longer but reduces the number of steps they can take.


 

EVH1 3-4


113. However, the stone will begin to curl when it loses its speed even though it is three or four times as [heavy / heavyly] as a bowling ball.



114. It's [calling / called] curling.



115. This is [why / because] players have to direct the stone's path carefully, and they do this by sweeping.


 

EVH1 3-5


116. Although the house—the area where the curlers aim the stone—[is / are] often blocked by an opponent's stone, curling teams can actually guide one stone behind another, which is one of the major strategic elements to the game.



117. Although the house—the area where the curlers aim the stone—is often blocked by an opponent's stone, curling teams can actually guide one stone behind another, [it / which] is one of the major strategic elements to the game.



118. Although the house—the area where the curlers aim the stone—is often blocked by an opponent's stone, curling teams can actually guide one stone behind another, which is one of the major strategic [element / elements] to the game.



119. The precision [with them / with which] the team can control the direction and speed of the stone is a major factor in the strategy of the game.



120. The precision with [which / what] the team can control the direction and speed of the stone is a major factor in the strategy of the game.



121. This [results from / results in] the stone going straighter and farther.



122. This results in the stone [going / gone] straighter and farther.


 

EVH1 3-6


123. Do the stitches serve a purpose other than [keep / to keep] the leather covering over the ball?



124. Do the stitches serve a purpose other than to keep the leather [covering / covered] over the ball?



125. The batter swings and [hit / hits] a foul ball into the stands.



126. You look at the baseball with its smooth leather [covering / covered]and bright red stitches.



127. You reach [to / X] up with your glove and catch it as other spectators clap and cheer.



128. You reach up with your glove and [catch / catches] it as other spectators clap and cheer.


 

EVH1 3-7


129. The stitches more or less scoop the air and [direct / directs] it inwards towards the back of the ball.



130. The stitches more or less scoop the air and direct it inwards [forward / towards] the back of the ball.



131. This difference in air pressure creates an [unwanting / unwanted] effect called "drag" that literally drags the ball backward and slows it down.



132. This difference in air pressure creates an unwanted effect [calling / called] "drag" that literally drags the ball backward and slows it down.



133. This effectively increases the net air pressure in the back of the ball, [it / which] reduces the drag.



134. When a round object like a ball is [thrown / throwing], the front part of the ball hits the air, increasing the air pressure there while the air becomes thinner at the back of the ball, making the air pressure low.



135. When a round object like a ball is thrown, the front part of the ball hits the air, increasing the air pressure there while the air becomes thinner at the back of the ball, [made / making] the air pressure low.


 

EVH1 4-1


136. After [passing / passed] through various auctions, the person in the portrait was finally identified as Mary Seacole.



137. An antique dealer accidentally found it behind a [framing / framed]print at a garage sale in Burford, U.K.



138. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and [purchasing / purchased] it, quoting that "as a woman and as a West Indian of mixed race, she broke many barriers to make a huge contribution to Victorian society."



139. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and purchased it, [quot / quoting] that "as a woman and as a West Indian of mixed race, she broke many barriers to make a huge contribution to Victorian society."



140. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and purchased it, [quoted / quoting] that "as a woman and as a West Indian of mixed race, she broke many barriers to make a huge contribution to Victorian society."



141. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and purchased it, quoting that "as a woman and as a West Indian of [mixing / mixed] race, she broke many barriers to make a huge contribution to Victorian society."



142. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and purchased it, quoting that "as a woman and as a West Indian of mixed race, she broke many barriers to make a [huge / hugely] contribution to Victorian society."



143. The National Portrait Gallery in London confirmed that the painting was genuine and purchased it, quoting that "as a woman and as a West Indian of mixed race, she broke many barriers to make a huge contribution [to / for]Victorian society."



144. The portrait has been [displaying / displayed] there since 2004.



145. The portrait has been [displaying / displayed] there since 2004.


 

EVH1 4-2


146. Her mother ran a [boarding / boarded] house while caring for wounded soldiers as if they were her own family members.



147. Her mother ran a boarding house while caring for [wounding / wounded] soldiers as if they were her own family members.



148. Her mother ran a boarding house while caring for wounded soldiers as if they [have / were] her own family members.



149. Her mother ran a boarding house while caring for wounded soldiers as if they [was / were] her own family members.



150. In fact, she [her / herself] contracted and recovered from it while in Panama.



151. In fact, she herself contracted and [recovering / recovered] from it while in Panama.



152. When she visited Panama in 1851, Mary managed [saving / to save] her first cholera patient, and in so doing she gained extensive knowledge of this disease.


 

EVH1 4-3


153. It was while she was in London in 1853 that she heard about the Crimean War and the collapse of the [nursing / nursed] system down there.



154. Mary, [whose / who] was then 50, was supposed to work officially as a sutler, someone who was allowed to sell goods to soldiers near the front.



155. Mary, who was then 50, [was / were] supposed to work officially as a sutler, someone who was allowed to sell goods to soldiers near the front.



156. Mary, who was then 50, [was / were] supposed to work officially as a sutler, someone who was allowed to sell goods to soldiers near the front.



157. Mary, who was then 50, was [supposing / supposed] to work officially as a sutler, someone who was allowed to sell goods to soldiers near the front.



158. She asked [her / herself], "Did these ladies shrink from accepting my aid because my blood flowed beneath a somewhat duskier skin than theirs?"



159. She immediately applied to the War Office to go to the Crimea and [help / helps] the sick and wounded soldiers.



160. She immediately applied to the War Office to go to the Crimea and help the sick and [wounding / wounded] soldiers.



161. Thousands of men were dying of cholera, dysentery, cold, and battle wounds [because of / because for] a lack of proper medical care.


 

EVH1 4-4


162. As soon as she arrived in the summer of 1855, however, Mary started to take care of the sick and [wounding / wounded] as if she were their mother.



163. As soon as she arrived in the summer of 1855, however, Mary started to take care of the sick and wounded as if she [have / were] their mother.



164. As soon as she arrived in the summer of 1855, however, Mary started to take care of the sick and wounded as if she [was / were] their mother.



165. One news reporter described her as "a warm and successful physician, [whose / who] doctors and cures all manner of men with extraordinary success.



166. One of the army [doctor / doctors] testified with admiration that despite the numbing coldness on the front line, Mary Seacole would care for the soldiers and provide them with tea, food, and words of comfort.



167. One of the army doctors testified with admiration [that / which] despite the numbing coldness on the front line, Mary Seacole would care for the soldiers and provide them with tea, food, and words of comfort.



168. One of the army doctors testified with admiration that [though / despite] the numbing coldness on the front line, Mary Seacole would care for the soldiers and provide them with tea, food, and words of comfort.



169. One of the army doctors testified with admiration that despite the [numbing / numbed] coldness on the front line, Mary Seacole would care for the soldiers and provide them with tea, food, and words of comfort.



170. She is always in attendance near the battle field to aid the [wounding / wounded] and has earned many a poor fellow's blessings."



171. This is [why / because] the soldiers of the British army came to call her "Mother Seacole."


 

EVH1 4-5


172. Fortunately, there were veterans who never forgot the [amazing / amazed] things that Mary had done on the battle field.



173. Fortunately, there were veterans who never forgot the [amazing / amazed] things that Mary had done on the battle field.



174. Fortunately, there were veterans who never forgot the amazing things that Mary [have done / had done] on the battle field.



175. It was reported [that / what] to their surprise, thousands of contributors gathered and her name was shouted by a thousand voices.



176. She [have spent / had spent] all her personal wealth in the Crimea.



177. She was also awarded three medals for her bravery and her work from England, Turkey, and France, [it / which] is vividly depicted in her portrait.



178. The last 25 years of her life, however, [was / were] spent quietly outside of public attention.


 

EVH1 4-6


179. Being a [bearing / born] healer, she made her own way to the war where she was needed.



180. During the Crimean War (1853-1856), Mary Seacole was from time to time [comparing / compared] to Florence Nightingale.



181. During the Crimean War (1853-1856), Mary Seacole was from time to time compared [for / to] Florence Nightingale.



182. In fact, she risked her life to aid the [wounding / wounded] and bring comfort to dying soldiers.



183. In fact, she risked her life to aid the wounded and [bring / brings]comfort to dying soldiers.



184. In fact, she risked her life to aid the wounded and bring comfort [to / for] dying soldiers.



185. In fact, she risked her life to aid the wounded and bring comfort to [dy / dying] soldiers.



186. Unlike Nightingale, Seacole had to overcome prejudice [relating / related] to her race.


 

EVH1 5-1


187. Can't ordinary people like you and me [be / is] creative?



188. The [following / followed] are some examples that tell us creativity is not a matter of talent or a gift, but is a matter of perspective nourished by passion and hard work.



189. The following are some examples that tell us creativity is not a matter of talent or a gift, but [is / are] a matter of perspective nourished by passion and hard work.


 

EVH1 5-2


190. A means of writing turned [for / into] an object of wonder because Dalton took a new perspective.



191. He carved [however / whatever] he could think of, from a farm house to a framing hammer, all at the very tip of a pencil.



192. He carved whatever he could think [of / to], from a farm house to a framing hammer, all at the very tip of a pencil.



193. He carved whatever he could think [to / of], from a farm house to a framing hammer, all at the very tip of a pencil.



194. He carved whatever he could think of, from a farm house [for / to] a framing hammer, all at the very tip of a pencil.



195. He carved whatever he could think of, from a farm house to a [framing / framed] hammer, all at the very tip of a pencil.



196. He saw a pencil on his desk, [picking / picked] it up, and started carving its lead with a sewing needle and a very sharp blade.



197. He saw a pencil on his desk, picked [up it / it up], and started carving its lead with a sewing needle and a very sharp blade.



198. He saw a pencil on his desk, picked it up, and [starting / started] carving its lead with a sewing needle and a very sharp blade.



199. He saw a pencil on his desk, picked it up, and started carving its lead with a [sewing / sewed] needle and a very sharp blade.



200. He saw a pencil on his desk, picked it up, and started carving its lead with a [sewing / sewed] needle and a very sharp blade.



201. However, he slowly and steadily improved his technique and [turning / turned] his inspirations into pieces of artwork.



202. In fact, a man named Dalton M. Ghetti looked at a pencil as art, not just as [a mean / a means] to create it.



203. Tiny but Shiny You would probably think [to / of] using a pencil to write or draw something.



204. Tiny but Shiny You would probably think of using a pencil to write or [draw / draws] something.



205. You might not imagine a pencil actually [be / being] a creation itself.



206. You might not imagine a pencil actually being a creation [it / itself].



207. [A mean / A means] of writing turned into an object of wonder because Dalton took a new perspective.


 

EVH1 5-3


208. From the right angle, a hand can be seen as two soccer players competing for a ball or a sprinter anxiously [wait / waiting] for the starter's gun to fire, as illustrated in Annie Ralli's works.



209. He was an art major, and his interest in wildlife protection led him to be [increasing / increasingly] involved in "handimals."



210. The Italian artist, Guido Daniele, can create [amazing / amazed] illusions with his hand art.



211. The animals he creates on hands look [so / too] realistic that whoever looks at them may not realize at first that they are just painted hands.



212. The animals he creates on hands look so realistic that [who / whoever]looks at them may not realize at first that they are just painted hands.


 

EVH1 5-4


213. At night, her hair will look pitch-black, [it / which] could never be reproduced by any artificial means.



214. At night, her hair will look pitch-black, which could never [be / is]reproduced by any artificial means.



215. He cuts out a hole in paper, and the gorgeous dress designs are [borrowing / borrowed] from the real world.



216. He gets his inspiration from golden leaves in an autumn garden [for / to] the blue sky on a summer day to cars and buildings on a busy city street.



217. The color of her hair changes [depend / depending] on the time of day and the position of the sun.



218. The color of her hair changes [depend / depending] on the time of day and the position of the sun.



219. They catch every clue in nature and [respond / respond in] novel ways.



220. They catch every clue in nature and [respond / responds] in novel ways.



221. They observe their surroundings with keen eyes, get [inspired / inspiring], add a little artistic touch, and put into life what we don't see.



222. They observe their surroundings with keen eyes, get inspired, [add / adding] a little artistic touch, and put into life what we don't see.



223. They observe their surroundings with keen eyes, get inspired, add a little artistic touch, and [put / puts] into life what we don't see.



224. They observe their surroundings with keen eyes, get inspired, add a little artistic touch, and put into life [that / what] we don't see.


 

EVH1 5-5


225. A green frog looks as if it [have / were] lifting the road and raking fallen leaves under it.



226. A green frog looks as if it [was / were] lifting the road and raking fallen leaves under it.



227. A manhole cover, [it / which] we can see on any city street, changes into a pineapple with some yellow paint.



228. The street comes [live / alive] and tells us an astonishing story, energizing people who are leading busy lives in bleak, urban environments.



229. The street comes alive and [tell / tells] us an astonishing story, energizing people who are leading busy lives in bleak, urban environments.



230. The street comes alive and tells us an [astonishing / astonished] story, energizing people who are leading busy lives in bleak, urban environments.



231. The street comes alive and tells us an astonishing story, [energized / energizing] people who are leading busy lives in bleak, urban environments.



232. Who would have thought [to / of] using train tracks as a music sheet?


 

EVH1 5-6


233. It looks [so / too] real that whoever happens to see it may be tempted to take the steps up to visit with those painted men and women.



234. It looks so real that [who / whoever] happens to see it may be tempted to take the steps up to visit with those painted men and women.



235. Lyon, a city in France, [is / are] famous for its murals.



236. The city greets its visitors with its [story-telling / story-telled] murals scattered all around it.



237. The only difference is that they try to find new things in [them / themselves] and their surroundings.



238. They seek to make connections that have never been [making / made].


 

EVH1 6-1


239. Factory Farming That Dries Up Our Planet Annual meat consumption has reached [to / X] an average of over 40 kilograms per person globally, and the demand is increasing.



240. Factory Farming That Dries Up Our Planet Annual meat consumption has reached an average [over of / of over] 40 kilograms per person globally, and the demand is increasing.



241. Pigs are raised in [confining / confined] pens and fed corn that has been grown in vast fields that stretch as far as the eye can see.



242. Pigs are raised in confined pens and [fing / fed] corn that has been grown in vast fields that stretch as far as the eye can see.



243. Pigs are raised in confined pens and fed corn that has been [growning / grown] in vast fields that stretch as far as the eye can see.



244. Pigs are raised in confined pens and fed corn that has been grown in vast fields that stretch as far [as / so] the eye can see.



245. This affects the ecosystems of such bodies of water, and the fertilizer runoff ends up in fish and other marine life for kilometers [around / around it].



246. To grow the corn, huge amounts of fertilizer are used, [it / which]eventually gets washed into rivers and streams.



247. [growing / to grow] the corn, huge amounts of fertilizer are used, which eventually gets washed into rivers and streams.


 

EVH1 6-2


248. Moreover, about one third of the world's fresh water is used for meat production, [it / which] cuts into the supply of water for humans.



249. Too much water has been [draining / drained] from the river as neighboring farms need to grow feed for cows.



250. Too much water has been [draining / drained] from the river as neighboring farms need to grow feed for cows.



251. Too much water has been drained from the river as neighboring farms need [for / to] grow feed for cows.



252. Too much water has been drained from the river as neighboring farms need to grow [feed / feed for] cows.


 

EVH1 6-3


253. As more people want more meat, [it / which] is inevitable that land for livestock be extended to meet the demand.



254. As more people want more meat, it is inevitable that land [of / for]livestock be extended to meet the demand.



255. As more people want more meat, it is inevitable that land for livestock [be / is] extended to meet the demand.



256. As more people want more meat, it is inevitable that land for livestock be [extending / extended] to meet the demand.



257. More meat production [results from / results in] increased water pollution in both rivers and oceans since cows and pigs eat a lot and at the same time produce a lot of manure.



258. More meat production results in [increasing / increased] water pollution in both rivers and oceans since cows and pigs eat a lot and at the same time produce a lot of manure.



259. When rain comes, manure is washed away with the runoff, [polluted / polluting] nearby soil, streams, and rivers all the way until it reaches the ocean.



260. When rain comes, manure is washed away with the runoff, polluting nearby soil, streams, and rivers all the way until it reaches [to / X] the ocean.



261. [from Land [for / to] the Ocean].


 

EVH1 6-4


262. Concentrated levels of nutrients in water [result from / result in] the blooming of algae, which are simple forms of water plants.



263. Concentrated levels of nutrients in water result in the blooming of algae, [it / which] are simple forms of water plants.



264. Once it reaches [to / X] the ocean, it contributes to the formation of what is known as a "dead zone."



265. Once it reaches the ocean, it [contributes / contributes to] the formation of what is known as a "dead zone."



266. Once it reaches the ocean, it contributes to the formation of [how / what] is known as a "dead zone."



267. Once it reaches the ocean, it contributes to the formation of what is known [to / as] a "dead zone."



268. The largest known dead zone [occurred / occurred in] the Gulf of Mexico in 2002, when runoff from the Mississippi River resulted in over 20,000 square kilometers of the Gulf area to become uninhabitable for oceanic life.



269. The largest known dead zone occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2002, [when / where] runoff from the Mississippi River resulted in over 20,000 square kilometers of the Gulf area to become uninhabitable for oceanic life.



270. The largest known dead zone occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2002, when runoff from the Mississippi River [resulted from / resulted in] over 20,000 square kilometers of the Gulf area to become uninhabitable for oceanic life.



271. The largest known dead zone occurred in the Gulf of Mexico in 2002, when runoff from the Mississippi River resulted [over in / in over] 20,000 square kilometers of the Gulf area to become uninhabitable for oceanic life.



272. When too many plants grow in the water, they use up the ocean's oxygen, [suffocated / suffocating] other plants and animals.



273. [Concentrating / Concentrated] levels of nutrients in water result in the blooming of algae, which are simple forms of water plants.



274. [Concentrating / Concentrated] levels of nutrients in water result in the blooming of algae, which are simple forms of water plants.


 

EVH1 6-5


275. However, about 15 percent is emitted by the [growing / grown]number of cows and pigs.



276. Methane is responsible [about for / for about] 16 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.



277. Methane is responsible [to / for] about 16 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.



278. Statistics [vary / vary about] the exact amount of methane emitted by a cow, but it is generally agreed that a single cow releases up to 120 kilograms of methane per year, more than any other domestic animal.



279. Statistics vary about the exact amount of methane emitted by a cow, but it is generally agreed [that / what] a single cow releases up to 120 kilograms of methane per year, more than any other domestic animal.



280. That doesn't seem like much, but experts warn that methane is over 20 times as [powerful / powerfully] as carbon dioxide in trapping the sun's heat in the atmosphere.



281. The [increasing / increased] demand for meat and meat products brings trouble not only to the natural resources under our feet but also to those overhead in the atmosphere.



282. The increasing demand for meat and meat products brings trouble not only to the natural resources under our feet but also [to / for] those overhead in the atmosphere.


 

EVH1 6-6


283. A cow does this [about for / for about] eight hours on average every day during which it keeps burping and passing gas, giving off methane into the atmosphere.



284. A cow does this for about eight hours on average every day [during them / during which] it keeps burping and passing gas, giving off methane into the atmosphere.



285. A cow does this for about eight hours on average every day during which it keeps burping and passing gas, [given / giving] off methane into the atmosphere.



286. As people prefer [increased / increasing] animal protein in their meals, our land, rivers, and oceans are bound to suffer with no solution in sight.



287. As people prefer increased animal protein in their meals, our land, rivers, and oceans are [bounding / bound] to suffer with no solution in sight.



288. As people prefer increased animal protein in their meals, our land, rivers, and oceans are bound to [suffer / suffer with] no solution in sight.



289. Imagine the enormous amount of methane emitted from the [burping / burped] mouths of 1.5 billion cows on six continents.



290. Koreans ate an average of 11 kilograms of meat per person in 1980, but the average [increased / increased to] 51 kilograms in 2014.



291. Methane is produced in a cow's special [digestive / digestiveness]system.



292. The food digested in the first two rooms is sent to the mouth [to be chewed / being chewed] again, and then sent to the third and the fourth rooms.



293. The world's livestock industries are growing at an [unprecedenting / unprecedented] rate due to population growth and rising incomes.



294. The world's livestock industries are growing at an unprecedented rate [due to / due for] population growth and rising incomes.



295. The world's population is [predicting / predicted] to reach around nine billion by 2050.



296. The world's population is predicted to reach [to / X] around nine billion by 2050.



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